Good water governance for inclusive growth and poverty reduction

Convenor(s):
International Water Management Institute; Water Research Commission;

Seminar 8 - 1st Session: Tools and methodologies for good governance 

Good governance from local to transboundary levels is a prerequisite for managing too much, too little and too polluted water with a view to contributing to more sustainable and inclusive growth. Stakeholder participation includes the recognition of power asymmetry and gender-differentiated roles in achieving good governance as central to effective, inclusive and efficient water resources management. How can robust public policies be designed and implemented that contribute to SDG 6 and other water-related goals? How to engage stakeholders effectively when dealing with diverse social and economic ‘endowments’? How can institutions translate local action into inclusive growth reaping the full benefits of national frameworks at all levels? How can the food, energy and the environmental sectors be brought into the equation; and what is the private sector’ contribution? Most importantly, how to ensure accountability and avoid corruption creeping in? This seminar addresses these and other critical issues.

 

During the seminar posters will be presented. Please find them online under the resources tab.

Tools and methodologies for good governance

Chair: Eiman Karar, UNEP

 

09:00     Seminar opening and aim of the session

              Prof. Guillermo Donoso, UCCL and Eiman Karar, UNEP

 

09:10     Dimensions and Principles of Water Governance
              Prof. Francisco Nunes Correia, Universidad Técnica de Lisboa

 

09:25     Water Stewardship: Enabling conditions for improved water
              governance in Europe
              Kathy Hughes, WWF

 

09:30     Progressive tariff: A way to promote equity and inclusive
              growth
              Dr. Imrul Muniruzzaman, WaterAid

 

09:35     Towards implementing the SDGs through multi-stakeholder
              platforms
              Dr. Nicole Kranz, International Water Stewardship Programme 
              South Africa

 

09:40     MSP/Social Learning Approach to Complexity of Basin
              Governance: Rufiji, Tanzania
               Mturi James, TAWASANET

 

09:45     Dynamics of change: network characteristics that improve
              service authority performance
              Duncan McNicholl, University of Cambridge

 

09:50     Roundtable discussions

  • Water stewardship                                   
  • Progressive tariffs
  • Multi-stakeholder platforms  
  • Social learning                                         
  • Networks     

 

10.12     Ramping-up access in Niger: reform, pro-poor policies, and
              performance
              Amianata Ibrahim, Veolia

 

10:16     Maximizing economic & social welfare through localised water
               resources management
               Kate Harawa, Water For People

 

10:20     Summary and wrap-up by moderators

Good governance from local to transboundary levels is a prerequisite for managing too much, too little and too polluted water with a view to contributing to more sustainable and inclusive growth. Stakeholder participation includes the recognition of power asymmetry and gender-differentiated roles in achieving good governance as central to effective, inclusive and efficient water resources management. Such aspects come to mind when considering good water governance which needs to be supported by practice rather than being an event or an end in itself. The core of this seminar stressed on inclusiveness, functionality and profitability of water structures. Balanced growth and poverty reductions were elicit from three continuous measurement levels: conditions, progress and impact of public policies in bottom-up and multi-stakeholder water networks. Novel methodologies and frameworks were discussed, from power asymmetries measurement approaches to transparent practices and economic viable strategies on access, management and reuse of water.

 

Initial session discussed on tools and methodologies. Prof. Francisco Nunes Correia reflected water governance as a myriad of rules, practices and processes than can effectively enhance inclusiveness in water policies. Concrete implementation of good practices like water stewardship and progressive tariff showed how collaborative action acknowledging cultural diversity, capacity gaps, and differential needs could enhance equitable growth and boost sustainable development on water management. Social network analysis, designed as a comprehensive assessment tool, identify political spaces for change and recognize power relationships of all stakeholders involved, so that water and sanitation development initiatives are fair and sustainable for all segments of society.

 

From theory to practice, second session showed successful case studies of good water governance that overcome barriers on implementation. Dr. Diana Suhardiman reviewed how understanding the cultural norms and practices are key to overcome the institutionalized corruption for structural change in water governance. Presentations from specialists promoted fruitful discussions on transboundary water management and performance measurement, through public-private partnerships and water infrastructure.

 

Following on the different levels of measurement, an important challenge to improve water governance is to overcome the difficulty to monitor/assess performance.  This requires an agreed set of specific indicators for good water governance that are not SDGs indicators.  Therefore, collecting the right type of data and the ability to channel such information to end users, relying on both government and non-government organizations, contributes to ensure the measurement of indicators of good water governance.

 

Good water governance requires the ability to mainstream integrity and transparency to respond to the need for structural change to reduce corruption. Policy reform to eradicate corruption requires careful consideration of the cultural setting and common practices of the society.  International donors and policy makers help strengthen ‘agents of change’ by working together with accountable agencies and institutions that act both as partner and third party observer, towards strengthening institutional accountability.

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